Pictorials

Pictorials

Navajo weavings that incorporate images of objects and people in their designs have slowly gained in popularity.Pictorial Rugs may include small representational images within a larger geometric design, or may consist primarily of a picture. Small pictorial motifs occasionally appeared on Transitional Period weavings and typically consisted of feathers, arrows, animals and other common objects that may have held some personal significance for the individual weaver. As the modern trappings of Anglo culture filtered onto the Reservation, strange new objects such as cattle, trains, American flags, and letters of the alphabet caught the fancy of some weavers. Navajo Pictorials made before the 1940s are relatively uncommon and usually command a premium price. After World War II, however, more weavers began making pictorial weavings, frequently filling a small rug with a single scene. Types that have been especially popular since the 1970s include landscape scenes which usually feature red cliffs or mountains, blue sky and clouds, juniper and pine trees, hogans, farm animals, trucks, and people. Another common format is called the Tree of Life pattern, consisting of a corn stalk rising from a Navajo wedding basket, with birds adorning the leaves of the cornstalk.

27 Items

per page
Set Descending Direction

27 Items

per page
Set Descending Direction

 

 

Would you like to learn more about authentic Navajo pictorial rugs and blankets? We invite you to view these videos by Medicine Man Gallery’s CEO, Dr. J. Mark Sublette.


 

 


Medicine Man Gallery CEO, Dr. J. Mark Sublette, is a leading authority on antique Navajo rugs and blankets. The gallery is located in Tucson, Arizona and has one of the largest collections of authentic Navajo textiles, including Navajo pictorial rugs and blankets.

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