Glen Crandall Biography

Glen Crandall Biography

 

Glen Crandall, Walnut and Tiger Maple Wooden Vessel, 4.5" x 7"

Glen Crandall, Walnut and Tiger Maple Wooden Vessel, 4.5" x 7"

 

In November of 1995, shortly after Glen retired, a friend gave him an old wood lathe. Although he had considerable woodworking experience, he had never used a wood lathe before. He glued up scraps of wood to turn and started to see designs found in Anazasi pottery.

 

Glen Crandall, Turned Jar of Cherry, Walnut, and Holly, 5.5" x 7.75"

Glen Crandall, Turned Jar of Cherry, Walnut, and Holly, 5.5" x 7.75"

 

At first he was largely self-taught, starting with the study of a book on the correct use of the lathe and turning tools. After that it was learning by trial and error, with a certain amount of excitement accompanying some of the errors. In the summer of 2003 and again in 2005 he took some classes on segmented wood turning.

 

Glen Crandall, Walnut and Holly Wooden Vessel, 3.5" x 4.5"

Glen Crandall, Walnut and Holly Wooden Vessel, 3.5" x 4.5"

 

Most pieces take about 40 to 60 hours of shop time, but the more complex patterns can take twice as long. Time spent in designing and drawing is in addition to that. Most pots consist of from approximately 150, to more than 500 individual pieces of wood. Woods are used both domestic and imported hardwoods. Generally the more colorful woods are used for the designs while the more common woods are used for the body of the pot. No paints or stains are used – the finish being clear varnish followed by a hard wax.

His designs are based mostly on Anazasi pottery. His greatest challenge and enjoyment comes from translating those designs into wood.

 

Glen Crandall, Mesquite, Tropical Walnut and Holly, 6" x 6.5"

Glen Crandall, Mesquite, Tropical Walnut and Holly, 6" x 6.5"