York, Star Liana

Star Liana York - Call of the Drum

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Star Liana York - Call of the Drum

  • Bronze
  • Edition: 35
  • 16'' x 7'' x 7''
  • $3,400.00
  • SLYCalloftheDrum
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Only one remaining in the edition, please call for availability. Among the many elaborate native ceremonials performed by the Rio Grande Pueblo Indians, the Corn Dance is perhaps the most dramatic example of an ancient religious ritual surviving unchanged through to the present day. Commonly performed in the spring and summer months, it is a combination of song, drama and dance which composes a prayer to the rain cloud people to bless the pueblo with moisture. In the land of little rain, water is vital to the propagation of all plant and animal life. To the hypnotic beat of tom-toms and the chanting intonations of a chorus, men and women dancers dance all day until sunset: the men prancing ahead, faces raised, feet pounding the earth to call the sleeping powers awake; the caress of the earth believed to invest them with fertility. The female dancers wear dark, hand-woven dresses accented by a red belt bound around the waist. Strands of shell beads encircle their necks. In each hand they carry evergreen boughs - a symbol of growing things and everlasting life. Their hair hangs loose in imitation of the long wisps of summer rain that sweep the land. And on their heads they wear tablitas (Spanish for "little tablet"): thin wooden boards, cut at the top in terraced patterns to suggest mesa and cloud formations, painted turquoise-blue, the color of the sky, adorned with sun and star designs and little puffs of eagle-down which represent clouds, the rain-bringing element of nature.The young Pueblo woman in this sculpture, as imagined by Star, is walking toward the plaza where the Corn Dance will be held. In the distance she can hear the drums. She is enlivened by anticipation, but there is also a hint of awareness in her expression - of a world beyond, behind, within.