Martinez, Julian (1885-1943)

Julian Martinez (1885-1943) - Avanyu and Warrior, c. 1920s, 9.5" x 12.5" (PDC90316A-128-003)

$1,100.00
Product
PDC90316A-128-003

Additional Information

  • Medium: Gouache on Paper
  • Circa: 1920s
  • Size: 9.5'' x 12.5''

Unframed. Total size with mat board is 15.75" x 18.75". Acquired from a private collection. The owner has authorized us to lower the price from $1,550 to $1,100. Julian Martinez was a well known San Ildefonso pueblo traditional painter, who had no formal art training. Having started painting in 1920, his traditional designs were developed before Dorothy Dunn founded The Studio School in 1932. Being an established artist, he was asked to paint murals for the new school. Julian also worked with his wife, Maria Martinez, with painting designs on her pottery. He also was the Governor of San Ildefonso pueblo for a time. Julian Martinez's works can be found at the Eiteljorg Musum in Indiana, the Philbrook Museum in Oklahoma, the Milicent Rogers Museum in New Mexico, Amon Carter Museum of Art in Texas, Amerind Foundation in Arizona, Arizona State Museum, Cincinnati Art Museum in Ohio, Columbus Gallery of Fine Arts in Ohio, Cleveland Museum of Art in Ohio, Denver Art Museum in Colorado, Dartmouth College Collection in New Hampshire, Thomas Gilcrease Institute of American History and Art in Oklahoma, Joslyn Art Museum in Nebraska, National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., Owensboro Museum of Fine Art in Kentucky, Marion Koogler McNay Art Museum in Texas, Museum of Northern Arizona, American Museum in Natural History in New York, Museum of New Mexico, University of Oklahoma, Riverside Museum in New York, School of American Research in New Mexico, Southwest Museum in California, University of Pennsylvania Museum, and the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian in New Mexico. Avanyu is Tewa for “water serpent” and is the Tewa deity, the guardian of water. Avanyu is the "one who lives in the water below the earth, one who carries us through the water of change.” It symbolizes the importance for water to life in the desert and is also associated with lightning in the serpent’s tongue. The curves of the serpent’s body represent flowing water. Avanyu is believed to have birthed the waterways and has the voice of thunder. The sacred Avanyu lives in streams and is feathered with a turquoise horn in the middle of its forehead. The horn moves, sending rain for crops. When the Avanyu creeps on the ground and snaps its tail, it causes thunder, and when its tongue strikes out of it mouth, it causes lightening. Seeing the Avanyu it will bring luck and good health, and it means there is water nearby or that it will rain soon. The San Ildefonso and Santa Clara pueblos of New Mexico commonly use the Avanyu design in their pottery.

Julian Martinez (1885-1943) - Avanyu and Warrior, c. 1920s, 9.5" x 12.5" (PDC90316A-128-003)
Julian Martinez (1885-1943) - Avanyu and Warrior, c. 1920s, 9.5" x 12.5" (PDC90316A-128-003) Julian Martinez (1885-1943) - Avanyu and Warrior, c. 1920s, 9.5" x 12.5" (PDC90316A-128-003)1 Julian Martinez (1885-1943) - Avanyu and Warrior, c. 1920s, 9.5" x 12.5" (PDC90316A-128-003)2 Julian Martinez (1885-1943) - Avanyu and Warrior, c. 1920s, 9.5" x 12.5" (PDC90316A-128-003)3 Julian Martinez (1885-1943) - Avanyu and Warrior, c. 1920s, 9.5" x 12.5" (PDC90316A-128-003)4 Julian Martinez (1885-1943) - Avanyu and Warrior, c. 1920s, 9.5" x 12.5" (PDC90316A-128-003)5
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